Why do we get Angry?

Over nothing? No.

Mostly, our anger is caused by – our thoughts, cognitive distortions, things not being in our control, excessive stress, unrealistic expectations and disappointments – both professionally and personally.

Anger can appear irrational but learning to look below the surface can reveal the cause. Identifying the cause is first step towards dealing with anger. Broadly the causes of anger can be categorized in two ways, (a) an irrational perception of reality (cognitive distortion) – where things must be done your way and (b) a low frustration point.

When angry a person experiences high physiological arousal. The pulse quickens, respiration increases, pupils of eyes constrict and adrenal glands pump out hormones. The negative effects of Anger however have more to do with the duration than frequency and intensity. Bearing resentment for a long time can cause more harm than a short burst of anger. Consistent long periods of anger greatly increase susceptibility to a host of diseases like ulcers, heart diseases and anxiety disorders.

Bottom line: We can all get frustrated and angry at times. The point is not to let it get the